Archive for September, 2007

Sweetest Day: Then and Now

Thursday, September 6th, 2007

As we transition from the lazy days of summer to the carefree autumn months, the earth changes before our very eyes. The landscapes become golden and the sound of rustling leaves fills the air. It is a time of great beauty and the perfect opportunity to spend quality time with loved ones close by or remember those far away.

Sweet Sentiments
A simple phone call or handwritten note can mean so much. Often in our busy lives we forget to remember the special people who make our days happy or those who are less fortunate. It was such a circumstance that brought the national holiday of Sweetest Day to light.

Observance of Sweetest Day
Sweetest Day observance originated in Cleveland in 1922. Herbert Birch Kingston, a philanthropist and candy company employee, wanted to bring happiness in to the lives of orphans, shut-ins and others who he believed were forgotten. With the help of friends, he began to distribute candy and small gifts to the underprivileged. On the first celebration of Sweetest Day, movie star Ann Pennington presented 2,200 Cleveland newspaper boys with boxes of candy to express gratitude for their service to the public.

Although the observance of Sweetest Day began in the Cleveland area, over time it has spread throughout the United States. Sweetest Day is always celebrated on the third Saturday in October. The Sweetest Day idea of spreading cheer to the underprivileged was broadened to include everyone from family members to co-workers, sweethearts and acquaintances. Sweetest Day has evolved into a time to express romantic love, and it is also used as a day to recognize anyone you appreciate.

Even though Valentine’s Day is thought to be the one day out of the year to send your heartfelt love, we at Calyx & Corolla share the wonderful sentiments of the Sweetest Day holiday and wanted to share its very special background with you.

Flower Fact…
Did you know…in the Middle Ages, when most plants were grown solely for practical or medicinal purposes, the rose was cultivated for its beauty alone. The rose is the national floral emblem of the United States.